Branched Molecules

 
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Not all chains are straight - indeed in crude oil, the majority of molecules present are branched. Any hydrocarbon with six carbons and fourteen hydrogens will be a hexane, but when branching is considered many different chemical structures are possible - these are called 'isomers'.

It is also possible to have the double bond in a place other than between the 1st and 2nd carbons in the chain. The table we showed you earlier only showed 1-alkenes, however the other possible alkenes are shown in the table below.

Below are the branched and unbranched molecules for a few of the alkanes and alkenes.

4 Carbons

n-butane

i-butane (2-methylpropane)
butanes
1-butene

2-butene

2-methylpropene
butenes

5 Carbons

n-pentane

i-pentane (2-methylbutane)

tert-pentane (2,2-dimethylpropane)
1-pentene

trans-2-pentene

cis-2-pentene

3-methyl-1-pentene

2-methyl-2-pentene

2-methyl-1-pentene

6 Carbons

n-hexane

3-methylpentane

2,2-dimethylbutane

2-methylpentane

2,3-dimethylbutane
1-hexene

trans-2-hexene

cis-2-hexene

trans-3-hexene

cis-3-hexene

4-methyl-1-pentene

2-methyl-2-pentene

2-methyl-1-pentene

trans-4-methyl-2-pentene

cis-4-methyl-2-pentene

2,3-dimethyl-2-butene

2,3-dimethyl-1-butene

3,3-dimethyl-1-butene

3-methyl-1-pentene

2-ethyl-1-butene

(E)-3-methyl-2-pentene

(Z)-3-methyl-2-pentene